The Difference that Day Makes

20160618-_09_poppyIn a corner of our garden, just where the conservatory joins the brick wall of the house, a mysterious plant has taken root. It has elongated, slightly furry leaves that lie flat close to the ground, and tall slender stems, about 12 inches high, producing multiple branching flower heads.  Despite its elegant, aspirational appearance, it is probably a weed.  But nothing else seems to want to grow in that corner, even the lawn, so we let the plant take over.  It pops up every summer, in greater and greater profusion.

For many years, if I was in one of my better periods, I saw the garden only at dusk.  I would look at the mysterious plant and think vaguely, “Those flowers will be interesting to see, when they finally come out.”  But they never seemed to, or I never noticed, and they turned into fluffy spherical seed heads without revealing any more.

This year, my first proper summer, the mystery has been solved.  I went out into the garden on a morning in June, and there were the flowers – bright orange and hairy, like multiple miniature dandelions.  And, like dandelions, of course, they close up, neatly and efficiently, as the sun begins to set.  As do the daisies that speckle the grass.  And the big silky poppies Pete planted in the border for photographic purposes.  And the small wild yellow poppies that have seeded themselves about the place.  And the gazanias.  Suddenly, going out in the daytime, I’m seeing all these discreet and bashful blooms splayed out shamelessly in the sun, being visited by pinstriped hoverflies and big fat bees.

Then, in July and August, at the high point of summer, I start seeing butterflies.  I’m utterly entranced, trying to follow with my eyes their crazy, non-rigorous, scatterbrained flight, picking out their colours and details as they tantalise among the flowers.

I’ve come across moths, of course, during my crepuscular phases, half seen and mysterious movements in the dim half-light.  But butterflies, supremely, are creatures of sunshine and the warmth of the day; I haven’t laid eyes on one for ten years.

They become my private symbol for this summer of renewal, for lightness and freedom after close and dark confinement, for the recovery of those thousands of pointless and trivial everyday choices which are none the less such a joy.

Café, with People

20131122-25nforgladeWe pick a dull morning in November 2015 for my first go at a café. Pete and I drive to the New Forest, to a wildlife park set among tall trees.  We arrive early, at 12pm, so there won’t be many people about, and we choose a table out of the direct glare of the fluorescent lights.

Pete goes to the counter to order our food. I have a baked potato with salad, and peppermint tea.  (Some things, I find, don’t change – those small metal flip-top teapots STILL pour water all over the table whenever you fill your cup).

The place fills up, and I stare and stare as I eat. I’m fascinated by people’s faces and smiles, their different sizes and shapes, their gestures and clothes.  I eagerly listen in on conversations in person and on phones. I even spot my first hipster beard, a phenomenon that, up til now, I have only read about in magazines.  It’s a fine example, black, silky and luxuriant, worn beneath large-framed spectacles in cherry red.

For so long I’ve had real people only in controlled doses, people I know, in ones or twos, very rarely more, and in my house. New companions joined me in the dark, as I listened endlessly to talking books, and for several intense hours I would follow their trials and tribulations, look on at significant moments of their lives.  But these were phantasmal beings, formed from the ectoplasm of words, edited, pruned, consistent, their very idiosyncrasies designed to facilitate the plot.

Real people are wild and weird and wonderful. They are hairy and bulging and scrawny and toned.  They discuss obscure matters with ferocious intensity but a maddening lack of specifics.  I feast on them as I eat my potato – I’ve been starved too long.

I still need to be prudent about the light, so we don’t hang around. After 20 minutes we get up to go – and I have the exquisite pleasure of discovering that not only did I not have to cook this meal, but I can leave the remains on the table, for somebody else to clear up.

 

Getting Better: The Science Part (1)

Here’s hstairs_santorin_portow the miracle happened. It’s such a totally cool miracle, it’s got scientific references…(see end of post)
1. J, wife of friend and newly trained nutritional therapist, persuades sceptical, grumpy Anna (who is pretty ill at this point) to write out a detailed medical history, describe all the treatments she’s tried, muster the results of all the tests she’s paid for over the years, list all the pills she’s taking, and keep a food diary.
2. Anna does all this, thinking: “Well, you can have a go, my dear, but I’ll eat my hat if you get anywhere.”
3. J reviews case and researches in medical and scientific journals. Comes up with hypothesis: massive build-up of histamine plus rampant histamine intolerance. She sends Anna some interesting papers including:Joneja and Carmona-Silva, Outcome of a Histamine-restricted Diet Based on Chart Audit, Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine (2001) ll, 249-262. (People with various skin conditions whose symptoms had resisted previous treatment improved on low histamine-diet).

Oksarharju et al, Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus downregulates FCERS and HRH4 expression in human mast cells, World Journal of Gastroenterology 2011, Feb 14; 17(6); 750-759. (Certain probiotic bacteria might diminish mast cell allergy-related activation.)

Histamine potential of foods and additives, Schweitzerische Interessengemeinschaft Histamin-Intoleranz (SIGHI),http://www.mastzellaktivierung.info/downloads/foodlist/21_FoodList_EN_alphabetic_withCateg.pdf

4. Anna, who’s already noticed that foods like sauerkraut and smoked salmon make her worse, goes on a strict low histamine diet, avoiding aged, preserved, canned and processed foods, plus specific foods like tomatoes which are naturally high in histamine and/or provoke the release of histamine by the body.Light sensitivity improves slightly.
5.Anna swaps standard probiotic for probiotics which actively increase DAO – histamine-reducing enzyme – in the gut(1)(2). Starts with Lactobacillus rhamnosus – light sensitivity improves. Adds in Bifidobacterium infantis – light sensitivity improves more.  Adds in Lactobacillus salivarius – light sensitivity improves further (probiotic powders from http://www.metabolics.com).
6.Essential Fatty Acid blood test shows deficiency in delta-6-desaturase(3), the enzyme needed to convert linoleic acid to gamma-linoleic acid (GLA). Anna takes borage oil which supplements GLA directly. Skin improves more.
7.DNA profile shows gene mutations(4)  suggesting Anna has problems making a compound called SAMe (5) (part of the methylation cycle), necessary to degrade intracellular histamine(6). Anna eats more choline-rich foods(7) , takes hydroxy B12(8)  and phosphatidyl choline supplements which all support SAMe production(9).  Light sensitivity improves further.
8.Second, more comprehensive DNA profile (from https://www.23andme.com) shows mutations on yet more genes involved in extracellular histamine degradation(10), confirming importance of assisting key parts of the methylation cycle to compensate. Anna also has mutations (on MAO A genes) that may interfere with degradation of biogenic amines, histamine being one of these. Anna starts B2 supplements to support MAO mutations.Light sensitivity improves further.

In June 2016, Anna, wearing a large hat and under a tree, sits in the garden on a sunny afternoon, FOR THE FIRST TIME IN TEN YEARS.


References

  1. Kukkonen K, Savilahti E, Haahtela T, Juntunen-Backman K, Korpela R, Poussa T,Tuure T, Kuitunen M (2007) Probiotics and prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides in the prevention of allergic diseases: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 119:192-8
  2. Mizuguchi D, Das H, Matsushita AK, Maeyama C, Umehara K, Ohtoshi T, Kojima J, Nishida K,Takahashi K,Fukui, H (2008). Suppression of histamine signaling by probiotic Lac-B: a possiblemechanism of its anti-allergic effect. Journal of Pharmacological Sciences, 107:159-166.
  3. Tollesson A, Frithz A, Berg A, Karlman G (1993) Essential fatty acids in infantile seborrheic dermatitis. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 28: 957-961.
  4. Preuss CV, Wood TC, Szumlanski CL, Raftogianis RB, Otterness DM, Girard B, Scott MC,Weinshilboum RM (1998) Human histamine n-methyltransferase pharmacogenetics: common genetic polymorphisms that alter activity. Molecular Pharmacology, 53:708-17.
  5. Barbosa PR, Stabler SP, Machado ALK, Braga RC, Hirata RDC, Hirata MH, Sampaio-Neto LF, Allen RH, Guerra-Shinohara EM (2007) Association between decreased vitamin levels and MTHFR, MTR and MTRR gene polymorphisms as determinants for elevated total homocysteine concentrations in pregnant women. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62:1010–1021.
  6. Lewis CA (2015) Enteroimmunology: a guide to the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. Carrabelle, Florida: Psy Press.
  7. McGuire M, Beerman KA (2015) 3rd Edn. Nutritional sciences:from fundamentals to food. Belmont, California: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
  8. Bolander-Gouaille C (2002) 2nd Edn. Focus on homocysteine and the vitamins involved in its metabolism: France:Springer.
  9. Zeisel SH (2006) Choline: Critical role during fetal development and dietary requirements in adults. Annual Review of Nutrition, 26: 229-250.
  10. Mitchell ES, Conus N, Kaput J (2014) B vitamin polymorphisms and behavior: Evidence of associations with neurodevelopment, depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and cognitive decline. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 47: 307–320.